Illumination - Spring 2012

  • 2009 self-portrait, Oulanka National Park, Finland. Read more on Essick’s blog post at photographyblog.com.

    Peter Essick

    2009 self-portrait, Oulanka National Park, Finland. Read more on Essick’s blog post at photographyblog.com.

  • Torres del Paine National Park, Chile: This once-inaccessible wilderness today attracts thousands of visitors.

    Torres del Paine National Park, Chile

    This once-inaccessible wilderness today attracts thousands of visitors.

  • Plant scientist

    Tracy Arm Wilderness, Alaska

    Icebergs in Alaska's Tongass National Forest.

  • Seno Pia: Glaciation on display in Tierra del Fuego, Chile

    Seno Pia

    Glaciation on display in Tierra del Fuego, Chile

  • Plant scientist

    Plant scientist

    Daniela Hohenwallner, a researcher with the Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA), charts how climate change is affecting the growth of mosses in the Austrian Alps. Learn more about Hohenwallner’s work, and the story behind the photo, by visiting Peter Essick’s blog

  • Man burning electronic waste

    Man burning electronic waste

    Because metals buyers won't accept copper wire until its plastic insulation is burned off, recycling workers like this young Ghanaian man are often exposed to harmful levels of toxic fumes and smoke. This 2008 image is from a National Geographic feature, “High Tech Trash”

  • Perito Moreno Glacier

    Perito Moreno Glacier

    The Perito Moreno Glacier in Argentina’s Los Glaciares National Park. Water pressure created by ice dams periodically causes spectacular ruptures in the Perito Moreno's glacial wall — events that draw thousands of tourists to the park each year.

  • Lodgepole Pines: Pines in the Ansel Adams Wilderness area.

    Lodgepole pines

    Pines in the Ansel Adams Wilderness area.

  • Arch Cliff: Fraser Island's mineral-rich sands bind together to create dunes as high as 800 feet.

    Wathumba Creek

    Wathumba Creek, stained brown from forest carbon nutrients, flows into the sea off Fraser Island, Queensland, Australia. At 1,840 square kilometers, Fraser is the world’s largest sand island.

  • Arch Cliff: Fraser Island's mineral-rich sands bind together to create dunes as high as 800 feet.

    Arch Cliff

    Fraser Island’s mineral-rich sands bind together to create dunes as high as 800 feet.

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